Nick Garbutt Wildlife Worldwide Photography Tours

Photography Tours Nick Garbutt WW logoI am pleased to offer an exclusive programme of wildlife photography tours in partnership with my friends at Wildlife Worldwide.

The aim of these tours is to offer unmatched experiences that maximize opportunities to photograph and watch wildlife in the finest locations and also to help participants improve their techniques and achieve the best results from their photography, irrespective of their level of experience.

Itineraries are carefully designed, with locations chosen to offer unrivaled photographic opportunities. While the pace of the tours allows ample time to get the most from the potential of each location. Informal workshops - tailored to suit all levels of experience - will cover a cross-section of photographic and digital processing techniques.

Binocular IconThe binocular icon denotes a tour that is also suitable for anyone who may be more interested in watching and enjoying wildlife, rather than concentrating principally on photography.

Nick’s Newsletter

Photography Tours Schedule

MADAGASCAR: South & West Delights: September 2016 (New Tour)

Binocular IconDates: 22nd September - 10th October 2016

Price: £4995 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £4195 (Twin-share: Ground Only)

Maximum Group 10
Current Availability: please enquire

Click for further details
Female Fosa climbing

Female Fosa climbing

Madagascar is a country like no other. Millions of years of isolation have led to the evolution of an array species found nowhere else. Add to this an extraordinary range of habitats and the result is a destination brimming with intrigue and excitement.

The island's most famous inhabitants are its lemurs - charming and highly varied off-shoots of the primate family tree: cuddly teddy-bear like indri and gorgeous diademed sifaka live in the lush eastern rain forests, while familiar ring-tailed lemurs only occur on the drier habitats of the south and south west. And only after dark do the island's 'Spirits of the Night' become active: miniscule mouse and dwarf lemurs scurry along branches, while hedgehog-like tenrecs bumble in the undergrowth.

There are numerous birds unique to the island, varied vangas with many beak shaped, noisy couas and colourful, skulking ground rollers. Reptiles too abound - over 60% of the world's chameleons live nowhere else and the amazing leaf-tailed geckos has near-perfect camouflage. Add to this a myriad of colourful and very vocal tree frogs and multitude of peculiar insects like the amazing giraffe-necked weevil and there is always something to grab your attention.

A male Parson's Chameleon climbing

A male Parson's Chameleon climbing

Golden Bamboo Lemur

Golden Bamboo Lemur

This trip will visit some of the island's prime sites like Ranomafana and Andasibe-Mantadia, together with less well-known but equally spectacular and unusual places like Ifaty and Kirindy Forest.

Long-tailed Ground Roller

Long-tailed Ground Roller

Ranomafana, towards the south-east, is one of the island's best known rainforest areas, that contains a wealth of wildlife, including Milne-Edward's sifakas and golden bamboo lemurs, one of the world's rarest primates. At Kirindy in the west, fragments of remaining dry deciduous forest support the beautiful Verreaux's sifaka, bizarre giant jumping rat and even the elusive fosa, the island's largest carnivore. While Ifaty is an area of bizarre spiny forest, with octopus trees and baobabs, that is home to some very rare birds, like long-tailed ground roller and sub-desert mesite.

In summary, Madagascar is intoxicating - a strange and incongruous mixture of wildlife and culture combine to produce a country unlike any other. Memories of the friendly people, unique habitats and wildlife will linger and the overriding experience will be of an island lost in time.

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
Nick with orphaned Ring-tailed Lemur

Nick with orphaned Ring-tailed Lemur

 

Nick and Madagascar

Nick is well-known as a leading authority on the wildlife of Madagascar. He first visited the island in 1991 and, with £200 in his pocket and 60 rolls of film, spent a month back-packing and exploring four of the parks and reserves. Since then, he has returned every year and in doing so has travelled the length and breadth of the island many times, visited all the major national parks and reserves and he has seen the majority of the island's lemurs (now more than 100 species) and other mammals in the wild, plus a very high proportion of the other endemic fauna.

He has written several books on the island's wildlife, including the highly acclaimed Mammals of Madagascar: A Complete Guide, Madagascar Wildlife: A Visitor's Guide and Chameleons and his enthusiasm for the country and its natural history remains undiminished and infectious.

MADAGASCAR: An Island Apart: North & East: October 2016
Red Ruffed Lemur calling

Red Ruffed Lemur calling

Binocular IconDates: 11th -31st October 2016

Price: £6495 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £5595 (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group 8
Current Availability: 2 places available

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Read an account of the 2014 trip

Madagascar is a country like no other. Millions of years of isolation have led to the evolution of an array species found nowhere else. Add to this an extraordinary range of habitats and the result is a destination brimming with intrigue and excitement.

Aye-aye foraging

Aye-aye foraging

The island's most famous inhabitants are its lemurs - charming and highly varied off-shoots of the primate family tree: cuddly teddy-bear like indri and gorgeous diademed sifaka live in the lush eastern rain forests, while rare red ruffed lemurs only occur on the Masoala Peninsula in the far north east. And only after dark do the island's 'Spirits of the Night' become active: miniscule mouse and dwarf lemurs scurry along branches, while hedgehog-like tenrecs bumble in the undergrowth.

There are numerous birds unique to the island, varied vangas with many beak shaped, noisy couas and colourful, skulking ground rollers. Reptiles too abound - over 60% of the world's chameleons live nowhere else and the amazing leaf-tailed geckos has near-perfect camouflage. Add to this a myriad of colourful and very vocal tree frogs and multitude of peculiar insects like the amazing giraffe-necked weevil and there is always something to grab your attention.

Golden-crowned Sifaka

Golden-crowned Sifaka

 

Painted Mantella

Painted Mantella

This trip will visit some of the island's prime sites like Masoala, and Andasibe-Mantadia, together with less well-known but equally spectacular and unusual places like Marojejy and Daraina.

Male Parson's Chameleon

Male Parson's Chameleon

Marojejy, towards the far north-east, is one of the island's truly great wilderness areas, where extensive lowland rainforests containing a wealth of wildlife, including gorgeous silky sifakas, one of the world's rarest primates. At Daraina in the far north, fragments of remaining forest support the beautiful golden-crowned sifaka and even the elusive aye-aye (during the 2013 and 2014 tours, we had excellent views of this bizarre animal - see photo).

In summary, Madagascar is intoxicating - a strange and incongruous mixture of wildlife and culture combine to produce a country unlike any other. Memories of the friendly people, unique habitats and wildlife will linger and the overriding experience will be of an island lost in time.

 

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
Nick with orphaned Ring-tailed Lemur

Nick with orphaned Ring-tailed Lemur

Nick and Madagascar

Nick is well-known as a leading authority on the wildlife of Madagascar. He first visited the island in 1991 and, with £200 in his pocket and 60 rolls of film, spent a month back-packing and exploring four of the parks and reserves. Since then, he has returned every year and in doing so has travelled the length and breadth of the island many times, visited all the major national parks and reserves and he has seen the majority of the island's lemurs (now more than 100 species) and other mammals in the wild, plus a very high proportion of the other endemic fauna.

He has written several books on the island's wildlife, including the highly acclaimed Mammals of Madagascar: A Complete Guide, Madagascar Wildlife: A Visitor's Guide and Chameleons and his enthusiasm for the country and its natural history remains undiminished and infectious.

ZAMBIA: South Luangwa Art & Photo Safari: November 2016
The class of 2015 with their work

The class of 2015 with their work

Dates: 19th - 28th November 2016

Price: £5595 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £4895 (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group 10
Current Availability: spaces available

LEADERS: Nick Garbutt & Nick Mackman

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Join Nick Garbutt and award-winning wildlife sculptor Nick Mackman on a bespoke workshop safari in Zambia's South Luangwa National Park. Wildlife photography and wildlife art and sculpture are very different and yet complimentary disciplines. Both require intense observation and the ability to interpret what is being seen, before depicting the subject in a way that ‘sets' it in time. In their different ways, the two Nicks have built their careers around their ability to do this.

Combining morning and afternoon game drives (when light conditions and wildlife activity are best) with practical demonstrations and tuition in field sketching, sculpture and photography. Nick and Nick aim to help participants translate what they see in the field into photos and field sketches and then finally into finished pieces of photographic or three-dimensional art.

South Luangwa sculpture workshop

South Luangwa sculpture workshop

The workshop is based at Mfuwe Lodge in the heart of Zambia's South Luangwa National Park: a location that offers unrivalled access to many of the best wildlife viewing areas in the park, where leopards, lions and painted hunting dogs are regularly seen. Indeed so much can often be seen within the lodge grounds that are often visited by several species of antelope and other species.

An elephant walks through reception at Mfuwe Lodge

An elephant walks through reception at Mfuwe Lodge

A male leopard begins stalking

A male leopard begins stalking

Most famously in November and December groups of elephants regularly passes through the lodge to feed on a favourite wild mango tree in the grounds, which is conveniently located right next to the open decking and temporary studio that is set up for this trip.

Nick and Elephant in South Luangwa

Nick and Elephant in South Luangwa

During previous workshops we have regularly had visits from elephants (and other wildlife) at the same time as practical sessions have been taking place. There really couldn't be a better place in the African bush to run such an event from.

Nick Mackman

Nick is an award-winning ceramic and bronze sculptor, who gains  her inspiration from the full breadth of the animal kingdom. The majority of her pieces are based on field observations, with South Luangwa being one of her favourite locations.

The finished sculpture

The finished sculpture

Most of Nick’s sculptures are Raku fired, giving a rich natural looking crackle glaze. She aims to get under the skin of the animal, giving each sculpture its own personality. Many of her subjects are endangered and, she seeks to enlighten the viewer to their beauty, humour and tenderness.

A baby ele takes shape

A baby ele takes shape

Her work is widely exhibited and found in international collections and in 2010 she won the Wildlife Artist of the Year Open Category and in 2012 was again a category winner and overall runner-up. Between 1998 and 2013 she made the trophies for the Wildlife Photographer of the Year Competition.

More information about Nick’s work

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
OXFORD: Bugs 'n' Beasts Indoors: January 2017
Deaf-Leaf Mantis

Deaf-Leaf Mantis

Dates: 20th - 22nd January 2017

Price: £595 (Twin-share)

Maximum Group 16
Current Availability: spaces available

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LEADERS: Alex Hyde & Nick Garbutt

Using captive-bred subjects like mantids, other invertebrates, lizards and snakes (all harmless), we will recreate the experience of photography in a rain forest and similar exciting tropical habitats. Good close-ups and portraits of such animals are always dramatic, but taking photos of these creatures is not necessarily straightforward and can seem challenging. However, this doesn't have to be the case....


Malaysian Orchid Mantis

Malaysian Orchid Mantis

Expert wildlife photographers Nick Garbutt and Alex Hyde will introduce and explain the necessary principles and techniques of this type of photography, so you too can create images with impact and successfully photograph small creatures next time you travel to the tropics or indeed in your back garden.

During the workshop, they will explain the basics and fundamentals and improve your ability to observe and ‘see a photo’. Concepts and techniques will be demonstrated, then, working in small groups or individually, with Alex and Nick’s guidance, you will be able to put what you have learned into practice.



Green Vine Snake

Green Vine Snake

The aim is that this weekend be informative and enjoyable and that you will leave with a selection of pleasing images and a new set of skills that you can put into practice on your next trip abroad or while visiting your local nature reserve.

Alex Hyde and Broad-leaf Marsh Orchid

Alex Hyde and Broad-leaf Marsh Orchid

Alex Hyde

I am delighted to be joined by good friend Alex Hyde on this trip. Alex is one of the UK's finest exponents of macro photography, combining the best of art and science into his exquisite images. He is a master of the technical aspects of digital photography and in the field or indoor workshop environment has the enviable skill of being able to convey challenging topics and ideas, concisely, simply and in a way that makes them understandable. To see more of Alex's stunning work click here

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour

Jonathan Cleverly

We are working with animal expert Jonathan Cleverly, a former teacher, who now runs his own educational business - Jonathan’s Jungle Roadshow - to help enthuse children and adults about the natural world. His particular passion is for weird and wonderful species, especially reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates. He has been keeping and breeding these animals for more than 30 years.

Jonathan's Jungle Roadshow

INDIA, LADAKH: Snow Leopards: February 2017 (New Tour)

 

Bharal or Blue Sheep: a main prey species for snow leopards

Bharal or Blue Sheep: a main prey species for snow leopards

Dates: 3rd-19th February 2017

Price: £4945 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Single Supplement: please enquire



Maximum Group 8

Current Availability: spaces available

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Dates: 18th February - 6th March 2017

Price: £5445 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Single Supplement: please enquire



Maximum Group 8

Current Availability: please enquire

Perhaps more than any other animal, the snow leopard epitomizes wilderness and mystery. Its presence in the remote regions of Central Asia seems almost spirit-like and sightings have, for so long, been regarded as mythical. In recent years, locations have emerged where sightings are possible and do offer a genuine chance of seeing the beautiful grey ghost. Rumbak Valley in Hemis National Park, Ladakh is perhaps the best known of these places and recently its popularity for snow leopard trekking has increased dramatically. Success rates in the area are very good, especially for those willing to spend up to a week in the valley. However, as the number of visitors has increase, facilities have lagged behind and living conditions are basic.

A Snow Leopard prowls snowy Himalyan slopes

A Snow Leopard prowls snowy Himalyan slopes

We have developed what we regard as a superior alternative that concentrates efforts in valleys to the north of the River Indus in Ladakh. We will be working closely with several local trackers from the Snow Leopard Conservancy who are renowned for the abilities to locate the cats and they will each work in different valleys to maximize our chances.

Leh, capital of the former Himalayan Kingdom of Ladakh

Leh, capital of the former Himalayan Kingdom of Ladakh

While the trackers search, guests follow in 4x4 vehicles, so they can move easily between locations and also get as close a possible to potential sightings before setting out on foot (although sightings also happen from road side locations).

While snow leopards are clearly the main focus, there is plenty of other Himalayan wildlife to see in the area. The valleys we will be based in are also excellent for ibex, wolf, fox, urial or shapo, blue sheep or bharal and Tibetan partridge.

Goats grazing in Ladakh

Goats grazing in Ladakh

Accommodation is a guesthouse with western-style toilets and washrooms, and a comfortable dining/lounge area. Staff and fresh supplies are brought in to cater for guests, and help provide with little luxuries to make the stay as comfortable as possible in such a remote location.

The planned itinerary will spend nine days in the snow leopard areas, with at least two days of acclimatization to altitude in Leh beforehand, plus travel days at either end, making the trip just over two weeks in duration.

 

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
INDIA: Wild Cats: Tigers & Leopards: March 2017 (New Tour)
The intense stare of a tiger is incomparable

The intense stare of a tiger is incomparable

Dates: 5th - 18th March 2017

Price: £4995 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £4195 (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Single Supplement: Please Enquire


Maximum Group 10

Current Availability: FULL

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With the specific focus on two of Central India’s big cats – tigers and leopards – this stand-alone tour is timed to follow on directly from our snow leopard tour in Ladakh (18th February - 6th March 2017).

Nowhere is quite like India. Be it sights, sounds or smells, the Subcontinent serves up a continuous and compelling assault on the senses. Few places more evocative or magical than one of its ancient forests: shrouded in early morning mists with shafts of light spearing through the trees spangled in a glorious palette of golds, ochres, oranges and greens, there is intense charged excitement when the alarm calls of monkeys and deer break the silence, as a tiger takes it first steps of the day. No other animal heightens awareness and sets the pulse racing quite like a tiger: even the tiniest inkling that there may be one in proximity - concealed, lurking, silent - sets the nerve-ends jangling.

A female Leopard with a cub

A female Leopard with a cub

While some of India's famous tiger reserves have become overcrowded in recent years, and unrewarding in the wildlife experience they offer, reserves remain where tigers are visible and the experiences are still memorable for all the right reasons. One of these is Kanha National Park, where moist deciduous sal forest and bamboo covers the hilly terrain, and open meadow areas form focal points for wildlife.
Kanha, is situated in the Maikal hills, in the Satpura range, and provides a quintessential Central India experience. Many believe its forests provided the inspiration for Kipling’s ‘Jungle Book’. It is without doubt one of Central India’s most diverse reserves and has been a Project Tiger reserve since 1974.

Male Tiger wanders a forest track in Kanha

Male Tiger wanders a forest track in Kanha

However in India it is all too easy to become preoccupied with one animal (the tiger) and judge the success of a tour around seeing it alone, yet the forests and remaining wild places of the subcontinent support a wealth of other charismatic species that are also exciting to see and photograph. Kanha also supports a broad diversity of other wildlife, including sloth bears, dhole (wild dogs), gaur (Indian bison), sambar and chital (spotted deer).

Photography at Jawai

Photography at Jawai

Leopards are by far the most numerous large predators in India, however, they are also India’s most elusive feline. There are healthy populations in and around all major tiger reserves including Kanha, but because of the threat posed by their larger more powerful cousins, leopards are always super secretive and conceal themselves in the heart of the most challenging terrain.

The Jawai Hills in Rajasthan is not tiger country, so here the leopard is the top cat and this area is known for a thriving population. What is more, they are far more visible and less secretive than their counterparts elsewhere.

Rabari herdsman and his flock

Rabari herdsman and his flock

Nestled in the Aravalli Hills between Jodhpur and Udaipur, Jawai is a remote rocky wilderness area, where crimson turban clad Rabari herdsmen share their rugged surroundings with wildlife. There are numerous ancient temples dotting the landscape and local folklore decrees that the leopards are their sacred guardians. The arid environment is home to natural prey species like nilgai and wild boar as well as langurs, wolves, sloth bears and a wealth of birdlife, including flamingos and sarus cranes at the nearby Jawai Bandh (one of western Rajasthan’s largest reservoirs).

By concentrating on these two very different areas that in combination present such diversity, this tour offers an opportunity to see and photograph two of the Subcontinent’s most iconic predators as well as a broad span of India’s other fabulous wildlife. It also allows you to experience India in a way that avoids the crowds as much as possible and provides an enthralling and evocative wildlife experience that will linger long in the memory.

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
TANZANIA: Serengeti Migration: March 2017
A male Cheetah descends from a tree stump

A male Cheetah descends from a tree stump

Binocular IconDates: 22nd March - 9th April 2017

Price: £7995 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £7195 (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group 8
Current Availability: FULL

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The annual migration of wildebeest, zebra and other game around the Serengeti-Masai Mara ecosystem is one of the world's greatest wildlife wonders. The spectacle is an ongoing event with the herds constantly on the move in search of the best pasture and grazing.

Their movements are governed by the annual cycle of rains, which dictates that the animals follow a predictable yearly circuit around the vast ecosystem. Between January and April the rains brings the herds, in their hundreds of thousands, to the fertile short grass plains of the southern Serengeti.

Here females give birth to their calves and males spar with one another to establish dominance. Witnessing this is one of the "must see" events of the natural world. 

 I have visited the Serengeti on countless occasions at this time and it never fails to captivate and set the pulse racing. Sightings and photographic opportunities on each trip have been different - with considerable year-by-year variation - but there are always many special encounters and sightings and the events witnessed live long in the memory.

Vast herds of White-bearded Wildebeest migrating across the Serengeti

Vast herds of White-bearded Wildebeest migrating across the Serengeti

Another amazing day in the Serengeti draws to a close

Another amazing day in the Serengeti draws to a close

For photographers the areas at the boundary of the Serengeti National Park and Ngorongoro Conservation Area consistently provide a stream of unrivalled opportunities for creating memorable images. Here the open plains are broken by areas of woodland with lakes and marshes that form focal points for the gathering herds and attendant carnivores. This trip makes the most of this special place with an extended stay in the area. Through a combination of morning, afternoon and full-day game drives, there will be ample time to explore the vicinity and go further a field to follow the shifting herds, look for cats (it can be exceptional for cheetahs) and other predators.

Lion cubs near Ndutu

Lion cubs near Ndutu

In addition the Ngorongoro Crater is an exceptional place, where tolerant game can be viewed in close proximity. Early morning and late afternoon light is often exquisite and all set against an awe-inspiring backdrop. The tour concludes at Ndaraqwai, a beautiful private camp with spectacular views of Mt Kilimajaro and Mt Meru. Set amongst grasslands and acacia woodland, a variety of habitats provide a home for a large diversity of mammals and birds. There are excellent opportunities to photograph elephants at close quarters and a combination of game drives and walks offers the potential for more varied photography.

 

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
DORSET: Spring's Treasures: May 2017
Comphrey at the Kingcombe Centre

Comphrey at the Kingcombe Centre

Dates: 12th - 14th May 2017

Price: £495 (Twin-share)

Maximum Group 19
Current Availability: spaces available

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LEADERS: Alex Hyde & Nick Garbutt

Whether you are new to photography or looking to fine tune your techniques, the rich ancient meadows of Kingcombe Nature Reserve will provide a tranquil and inspiring workshop environment in which to further develop your skills. 



Oxeye Daisies

Oxeye Daisies

The Kingcombe Centre in Dorset will be our base for a weekend packed with opportunities to improve your nature photography. Award-winning photographers Nick Garbutt and Alex Hyde will introduce and explain the necessary principles and techniques, so you too can create images with impact and successfully photograph small creatures and plants next time you travel abroad or indeed step into your back garden.

Adult Mayfly just after emergence

Adult Mayfly just after emergence

The hedgerows, fields and hay meadows surrounding the Kingcombe Centre have remained much as they were for over 200 years and are almost untouched by artificial fertilisers and pesticides. As a result they are home to a huge array of wildlife, some common and easy to see, others rare elsewhere in the UK. The wildflower meadows are a reminder of how much of the countryside used to look, with the air buzzing with bees, butterflies and other insects.

The aim  is that this weekend be informative and enjoyable and that you will leave with a selection of pleasing images and a new set of skills that you can put into practice on your next trip abroad or while visiting your local nature reserve.

Alex Hyde and Broad-leaf Marsh Orchid

Alex Hyde and Broad-leaf Marsh Orchid

Alex Hyde

I am delighted to be joined by good friend Alex Hyde on this trip. Alex is one of the UK's finest exponents of macro photography, combining the best of art and science into his exquisite images. He is a master of the technical aspects of digital photography and in the field or indoor workshop environment has the enviable skill of being able to convey challenging topics and ideas, concisely, simply and in a way that makes them understandable. To see more of Alex's stunning work click here

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
BORNEO: FESTIVAL OF WILDLIFE: June 2017
Mist hanging over Segama River

Mist hanging over Segama River

Binocular IconDates: 2nd - 11th June 2017

Price: £5195 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £4475 (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group 46 split into small subgroups
Current Availability: spaces available

The Festival of Wildlife is a unique event that celebrates all aspects of natural history in its chosen location. I have again been invited to take part: in 2017 it will be held in Borneo to marks 25 years of Wildlife Worldwide. This is a perfect way to enjoy the island's fantastic wildlife alongside a team of experts who will share their enthusiasm and knowledge to augment your experience.

A Western Tarsier seen on a night walk

A Western Tarsier seen on a night walk

The expert team includes naturalists and TV presenters Nick Baker and Nigel Marven, award-winning sculptor Nick Mackman, macro photography expert Alex Hyde, wildlife artist Yee Ting Wong and Borneo's leading naturalist Dr Arthur Chung.

Based in Danum Valley (which happens to be my favourite rainforest anywhere), you will be able to immerse yourself daily wildlife activities and a series of unique presentations, workshops and master classes in the company of the experts.

Müller's Bornean Gibbon in Danum

Müller's Bornean Gibbon in Danum

The pristine rainforest that surrounds our luxury lodge is one of the best places to see wild orang-utans and other primates like maroon langurs and Bornean gibbons. The birdlife is spectacular too, with many canopy species like hornbill's visable from raised walkways through the tree-tops.

There is also scope for exciting night walks - Danum is exceptional - where a completely different cast of characters become visible; there are frogs, reptiles, bizarre invertebrates and if fortune favours endearing mammals like the western tarsier, slow loris and giant flying squirrel.

Photographing a Wagler's Pit Viper in Danum Valley

Photographing a Wagler's Pit Viper in Danum Valley

Over the years, the Festival of Wildlife concept has evolved to become a week-long event packed with a variety of activities in the world's finest wildlife locations. It is a unique way to revel in the natural world and I enjoy every minute and the Borneo incarnation is certain to be unforgetable.

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
AUSTRIA: Close-up on Alpine Nature: June 2017
Mountain Apollo roosting

Mountain Apollo roosting

Dates: 17th - 24th June 2017

Optional Extension: 24th - 29th June 2017

Price: £1595 (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group 10
Current Availability: spaces available

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LEADERS: Alex Hyde & Nick Garbutt

June sees the alpine meadows of the Austrian Tyrol in their full glory. They are flushed with a spectacular show of wild flowers, and an equally stunning array of butterflies and other insects. This is the perfect time to visit for our macro photography tour.

A riot of colour: An Alpine meadow in full bloom

A riot of colour: An Alpine meadow in full bloom

We will explore the many and varied meadows and discover a rich flora and along the way encounter many exciting and beautiful insects that flourish on these alpine slopes. In the locations we visit there is a good chance of finding the iconic apollo butterfly. Moving higher up the slopes, the colourful meadows give way to swathes of vibrant alpenrose and high alpine species such as dwarf snowbell and trumpet gentian.

Trumpet Gentians

Trumpet Gentians

The tour has been designed to maximise macro opportunities.  Along with a renowned local guide, we will take you through all you need to know to photograph the region’s fascinating plants and wildlife. There will be an emphasis on macro techniques, as well as general and landscape elements. We will also photograph other attractions such as marmots, mountaintops at sunrise and dramatic glacial valleys.

Whether a beginner or a seasoned photographer, you will benefit from the tutors’ guidance and experience. We will be looking at all aspects of macro photography from the basics through to advanced techniques like focus stacking.

Burnt or Burnt-tip Orchid at sunrise

Burnt or Burnt-tip Orchid at sunrise

In addition there will be indoor workshops on digital workflow. You will learn how Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop techniques can complement your field skills and let you get the most from your digital camera.

A friendly family-run hotel provides the perfect base for our week of photography and fresh mountain air. Flexible transport arrangements mean that we can make best use of the light. A short drive takes us to an extensive cable car network, making access to high mountain scenery and plants easy.

Alex Hyde and Broad-leaf Marsh Orchid

Alex Hyde and Broad-leaf Marsh Orchid

Alex Hyde

I am delighted to be joined by good friend Alex Hyde on this trip. Alex is one of the UK's finest exponents of macro photography, combining the best of art and science into his exquisite images. He is a master of the technical aspects of digital photography and in the field or indoor workshop environment has the enviable skill of being able to convey challenging topics and ideas, concisely, simply and in a way that makes them understandable. To see more of Alex's stunning work click here

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
CANADA: British Columbia: Face to Face with Grizzly Bears: July 2017 (New Tour)

 

Grizzly Bear with Pink Salmon

Grizzly Bear with Pink Salmon

Dates: 25th July - 4th August 2017

Price: £7895 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)

Maximum Group Size: 8
Current Availability: please enquire

Click for further details

Close encounters with large carnivores are perhaps the most thrilling and exhilarating experiences in the natural world. Of course in most instances these occur from the safely and sanctuary of a vehicle or hide. Opportunities to share open space with an apex predator are rare.

We have found a remote location in northern British Columbia that offers a unique experience where Grizzly Bears gather to fish for salmon. There are, of course, many well-known locations to watch bears fishing, but what the Taku River offers is very different and extremely special.

Grizzly Bear on the Taku River.

Grizzly Bear on the Taku River.

At a remote location on the river, the Grizzlies are habituated and completely relaxed while being watched and from specific viewing locations along the riverbanks, it is possible to observe and photograph bears at close quarters. Very close quarters.

Over many years the bears have become completely comfortable with the small, simple river-side lodge and very small numbers of guests, so continue to go about their daily routines and business as if no one was there.

Grizzly Bear cub (7 months)

Grizzly Bear cub (7 months)

This offers some of the most spectacular and intimate Grizzly Bear photography opportunities imaginable. On a daily basis there will be numerous close encounters with the bears – there are dominant males, females and often younger bears and cubs – and watching them interact with one another, fish in the river, eat and rest on the banks and play will present unrivalled photography potential.

A Grizzly near the lodge

A Grizzly near the lodge

In so many alternative locations, photography is limited to using telephoto lenses. No so here. Along the Taku River there will be many situations when you will be taking pictures with wideangle lenses (the bears really do come that close!), as well as the more regular telephotos. And many of these encounters happen within and around the lodge area. It is quite possible you will be sat outside you cabin watching and photographing Grizzly Bears that are touching distance away.

The Taku River is situated in the extreme north of British Columbia, in one of the most remote and spectacularly beautiful parts of the Pacific North West. It is an utterly pristine area that has remained cut off and isolated, the preserve of wildlife and rarely touched by humanity. In addition to the bears, the spawning salmon also attract other predators like Bald Eagles and sometimes, even Grey Wolves.

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BRAZIL: The Pantanal, North: August 2017
Giant River Otter feeding on Striped Catfish or Cachara. Cuiaba River, Pantanal, Brazil.

Giant River Otter eating fish

Binocular IconDates: 25th August - 11th September 2017

Optional Extensions:
Iguazzu Falls

21st - 26th Aug 2017

Southern Pantanal
10th - 18th Sept 2017

Price: £8295 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £7295 (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group Size: 10
Current Availability: FULL

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Read Tour Report 2014

In the heart of South America, south of Amazonia and east of the Andes, lies an immense landlocked delta where seasonal floodwaters rise then recede providing an annual pulse of nutrients that results in one of the richest wildlife areas on earth - the Pantanal.

Toco Toucan feeding Cuiaba River Pantanal

Toco Toucan feeding

After rains in the surrounding uplands, more than 80% of the Pantanal becomes submerged (December-March) and wildlife is dispersed around the limited areas of dry land, but as these waters drain away and the land dries out, migratory birds return and other wildlife becomes more concentrated. These concentrations reach their peak in the dry season (July-October) when the remaining pools and flowing watercourses act like wildlife magnets.

The quantity of wildlife the area supports is breath taking, but it is more its accessibility that makes a trip to the Pantanal so memorable and rewarding photographically. Seeing iconic and rare animals frequently and closely is a very real possibility.

Jaguars generally top everyone's wish list: there is no finer place in the world to capture images of  South America's apex predator and the chances of success are very realistic. This tour spends time in two river locations that are renowned: during morning and afternoon boat trips there is an excellent change of encountering jaguars, some times within pulse-racing close proximity.

Female Jaguar with young cub, in the Pantanal

Female Jaguar with young cub, in the Pantanal

Sunbittern displaying. Hato La Aurora Reserve, Los Llanos, Colombia.

Sunbittern displaying

Add to this, the likelihood of encounters with giant otters (the Pantanal is arguably now the best place in South America to see these magnificent creatures), Brazilian tapir, giant anteaters, hyacinth macaws, howler and capuchin monkeys, jabiru storks, toco toucans and countless capybara, yacare caiman and a wealth of colourful bird life it is easy to appreciate why the Pantanal is regarded as such a special place.

Capybara swimming with young, Paraguay River, Taiama Reserve

Capybara swimming with young

We combine two prime jaguar locations (8 nights), with a mixture of other locations away from major rivers where different habitats - a mosaic of grasslands, marshes, small rivers and still waters and forest patches - provide refuge for a tremendous diversity of species that are both relatively easy to see and approachable enough to offer great photo opportunities. Wildlife watching and photography on the rivers is by small boat, while at others locations there is a combination of guided walks, drives in safari trucks, night drives and horse riding.

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BRAZIL: The Pantanal North & South: Jaguar Fiesta: September 2017 (New Tour)
Giant Anteater, Southern Pantanal

Giant Anteater, Southern Pantanal

Binocular IconDates: 9th - 25th September 2017

Price: £8395 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £7295 (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group Size: 12
Current Availability: please enquire

Click for further details
Hyacinth Macaw in its nest hole

Hyacinth Macaw in its nest hole

In the heart of South America, south of Amazonia and east of the Andes, lies an immense landlocked delta where seasonal floodwaters rise then recede providing an annual pulse of nutrients that results in one of the richest wildlife areas on earth - the Pantanal.

After rains in the surrounding uplands, more than 80% of the Pantanal becomes submerged (December-March) and wildlife is dispersed around the limited areas of dry land, but as these waters drain away and the land dries out, migratory birds return and other wildlife becomes more concentrated. These concentrations reach their peak in the dry season (July-October) when the remaining pools and flowing watercourses act like wildlife magnets.

The quantity of wildlife the area supports is breath taking, but it is more its accessibility that makes a trip to the Pantanal so memorable and rewarding photographically. Seeing iconic and rare animals frequently and closely is a very real possibility.

The jaguar generally top everyone's wish list and this special tour places particular emphasis on South America's apex carnivore. Not only will this trip give you the chance of seeing and photographing the cats, but also actively participating in and actively supporting valuable research and conservation work.

The Pantanal can conveniently be divided into North and South: each is very different in character with different strengths and highlights. Here we combine the best elements of both.

A male Jaguar walking through the river shallows in the Pantanal.

A male Jaguar walking through the river shallows in the Pantanal.

Red-and-Green Macaws at Buraco das Araras

Red-and-Green Macaws at Buraco das Araras

On a vast ranch in the southern Pantanal we will spend three days (by day and night) with a jaguar research team, helping them radio-track and monitor a very healthy population of the cats. Close encounters and terrific photo opportunities are regular.

Also in the south we visit areas that are excellent for giant anteaters and other species typical of the region. Another particular photographic highlight is the 'Sinkhole of the Macaws', where large numbers of colourful Red-and-Green Macaws gather to roost and breed.

Male Black Howler Monkey

Male Black Howler Monkey

Yacare Caiman bask along a Pantanal waterway

Yacare Caiman bask along a Pantanal waterway

In the North Pantanal, the habitat can be different and we visit two locations that offer tremendous diversity. One of these is set on major river and is a prime location for viewing jaguars. Boat trips are the best way to explore the area and these regularly offer excellent, often pulse-racing sightings. There is also a wealth of other wildlife, including giant otters (the Pantanal is arguably now the best place in South America to see these magnificent creatures), Brazilian tapir, occasionally ocelot, hyacinth macaws, howler and capuchin monkeys, jabiru storks and countless capybara, yacare caiman and a wealth of colourful birds. With such accessible and easily seen wildlife it is easy to appreciate why the Pantanal is regarded as such a special place.

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MADAGASCAR: An Island Apart: October 2017
Aye-aye foraging

Aye-aye foraging

Binocular IconDates: 10th - 30th October 2017

Price: £6495 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Single Supplement: £460
Maximum Group 8
Current Availability: please enquire

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Madagascar is a country like no other. Millions of years of isolation have led to the evolution of an array species found nowhere else. Add to this an extraordinary range of habitats and the result is a destination brimming with intrigue and excitement.

Helmet Vanga on nest

Helmet Vanga on nest

The island's most famous inhabitants are its lemurs - charming and highly varied off-shoots of the primate family tree: cuddly teddy-bear like indri and gorgeous diademed sifaka live in the lush eastern rain forests, while rare red ruffed lemurs only occur on the Masoala Peninsula in the far north east. And only after dark do the island's 'Spirits of the Night' become active: miniscule mouse and dwarf lemurs scurry along branches, while hedgehog-like tenrecs bumble in the undergrowth.

There are numerous birds unique to the island, varied vangas with many beak shaped, noisy couas and colourful, skulking ground rollers. Reptiles too abound - over 60% of the world's chameleons live nowhere else and the amazing leaf-tailed geckos has near-perfect camouflage. Add to this a myriad of colourful and very vocal tree frogs and multitude of peculiar insects like the amazing giraffe-necked weevil and there is always something to grab your attention.
 

Female Silky Sifaka with infants

Female Silky Sifaka with infants

Male Giraffe-necked Weevil

Male Giraffe-necked Weevil

This trip will visit some of the island's prime sites like Masoala, and Andasibe-Mantadia, together with less well-known but equally spectacular and unusual places like Marojejy and Daraina.

Male Panther Chameleon

Male Panther Chameleon

Marojejy, towards the far north-east, is one of the island's truly great wilderness areas, where extensive lowland rainforests containing a wealth of wildlife, including gorgeous silky sifakas, one of the world's rarest primates. At Daraina in the far north, fragments of remaining forest support the beautiful golden-crowned sifaka and even the elusive aye-aye (during the 2013 and 2014 tours, we had excellent views of this bizarre animal - see photo).

In summary, Madagascar is intoxicating - a strange and incongruous mixture of wildlife and culture combine to produce a country unlike any other. Memories of the friendly people, unique habitats and wildlife will linger and the overriding experience will be of an island lost in time.

 

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Nick with orphaned Ring-tailed Lemur

Nick with orphaned Ring-tailed Lemur

Nick and Madagascar

Nick is well-known as a leading authority on the wildlife of Madagascar. He first visited the island in 1991 and, with £200 in his pocket and 60 rolls of film, spent a month back-packing and exploring four of the parks and reserves. Since then, he has returned every year and in doing so has travelled the length and breadth of the island many times, visited all the major national parks and reserves and he has seen the majority of the island's lemurs (now more than 100 species) and other mammals in the wild, plus a very high proportion of the other endemic fauna.

He has written several books on the island's wildlife, including the highly acclaimed Mammals of Madagascar: A Complete Guide, Madagascar Wildlife: A Visitor's Guide and Chameleons and his enthusiasm for the country and its natural history remains undiminished and infectious.

PERU: Amazon Rainforest Workshop: November 2017 (New Tour)
Sparkling Violetear are common in many cloud forests

Sparkling Violetear are common in many cloud forests

Dates: 9th - 25th November 2017

Price: £5595 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £4695(Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group 12
Current Availability: spaces available

LEADERS: Nick Garbutt & Alex Hyde*
* Two leaders only if group size is 7 or more

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Peru’s Manu Biosphere Reserve is one of the most biologically diverse places on earth. Tropical rainforests anywhere are extremely rich, but Manu is exceptional and has earned Manu its reputation as the jewel of Amazon wildlife viewing experiences.

The spectacular Andean Cock-of-the-Rock

The spectacular Andean Cock-of-the-Rock

Consisting of several very different habitats and ecological zones, Manu is the perfect location to host this three location rainforest workshop tour, that visits the several principle areas of greatest species richness. Our overland route takes us from highland Andean cloud forest to lowland Amazonian rain forest.

Giant River Otter in the Amazon

Giant River Otter in the Amazon

The cloud forests are rich in birdlife including the iconic Andean  cock-of-the-rock - we will spend time at the well-known lek (a dancing ground where males display to females) where good photography opportunities are possible. Other specialties include several species of hummingbirds, toucans and quetzals. A diversity of butterflies and other invertebrates as well as large number of frogs are sure to provide us with a wealth of photographic possibilities.

Once in the lowlands we venture deep into the Peruvian Amazon and stay at two different locations. The first allows access to two oxbow lakes, which are home to giant otters, while the surrounding forests supports 13 species of monkeys and an abundance of birdlife. Viewing from lake platforms and canopy towers offers excellent photographic opportunities.

Hoatzin in river-side vegetation

Hoatzin in river-side vegetation

The location off the Manu River, promises to be the highlight of the tour. Here two separate clay licks offer excellent chances of photographing South American Tapir and flocks of noisy scarlet macaws. There are also oxbow lakes with resident giant otters and canopy towers that are ideal for photographing many species that are inaccessible from ground level, especially birds.

Throughout the trip in all suitable locations we will also explore areas after dark. Night walks are an idea way to hunt for frogs and some of the extraordinary invertebrate diversity for which Amazon rainforests are renowned and these will provide a wealth of photographic subjects.

Tree frogs abound in Manu

Tree frogs abound in Manu

Why a Workshop?
Tropical rainforests are the greatest expressions of life on the planet and offer a wonderful array of species, but they are also amongst the most challenging places to take photos successfully. This workshop tour is hosted by two leaders with a wealth of rainforest photography experience, to maximize advisory and teaching potential, so that participants gain as much insight as possible.    

Alex Hyde
Alex_HydeI am delighted to be joined by good friend Alex Hyde on this trip. Alex is one of the UK's finest exponents of macro photography, combining the best of art and science into his exquisite images. He is a master of the technical aspects of digital photography and in the field or indoor workshop environment has the enviable skill of being able to convey challenging topics and ideas, concisely, simply and in a way that makes them understandable. To see more of Alex's stunning work click here

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
PERU: Tambopata Rainforest Extension: November 2017 (New Tour)
A Curl-crested Araçari preens in the canopy

A Curl-crested Araçari preens in the canopy

Dates: 25th - 30th November 2017

Price: £TBC (Twin-share)
Maximum Group 8
Current Availability: spaces available
LEADER: Nick Garbutt

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Tambopata Reserve, is widely regarded as one of the greatest wildlife locations in South America. It harbours some of the wildest, least human-impacted habitats that remain anywhere in the world. Here pristine rainforests and tropical savannahs meet in a land where rivers are the only means of accessing the remote areas.

The Heath River is one of the many rivers that drains the region and it passes through one of the largest tracts of undisturbed Upper Amazonian rain forests that is home to jaguars, giant otter, South American tapirs, six species of monkey, numerous species of macaws and other parrots, over 400 other bird species and a myriad of amphibians, reptiles and invertebrates.

Red-and-Green Macaws in flight

Red-and-Green Macaws in flight

The Heath River Wildlife Centre is the only lodge in the entire region, so offers exclusive access to both the rainforests and the adjacent grassland areas. The lodge’s unquestionable highlight is one of the top five macaw and parrot clay licks that are known. Each day upwards of 200 brightly coloured macaws gather, just 30m in front of the hide. The photography opportunities are very special.

Squirrel Monkey in rainforest canopy

Squirrel Monkey in rainforest canopy

During quiet boat rides up and down stream it is sometime possible to see a jaguar basking on an overhanging log or maybe a tapir swimming across the stream. A variety of trails near the lodge offer convenient wildlife viewing and photography opportunities, with several species of monkey often seen including red howlers and squirrel monkeys and a wealth of bird life. The nearby canopy tower is another ideal place to spend time early morning, as a variety of species can easily be seen, especially if there is a fruiting tree close by.

A trail through forest then abruptly gives way to open grasslands (pampas), where red-bellied and blue-and-yellow macaws nest. There is also a watchtower to enjoy an elevated view of this area, and if you are very lucky perhaps spot a maned wolf.

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YELLOWSTONE: Wild West Winter Wonderland: January 2018
Yurt Camp by night

Yurt Camp by night

Binocular IconDates: 18th January - 3rd February 2018

Price: £6295 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £5445 (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Single Supplement: £ please enquire
Maximum Group 8
Current Availability: spaces available

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Read Tour Report 2016

The Madison River Valley offers a realistic chance of seeing a Bobcat

The Madison River Valley offers a realistic chance of seeing a Bobcat

Yellowstone was the world's first national park (established in 1872) and remains as breathtaking as ever. Its grandeur is unquestionable at any time, but in the depths of winter the landscape takes on an ethereal harsh beauty.

The juxtaposition of fairytale frosts, ice and snow with swirling mists and rising steam from countless hot springs and geysers (the park contains half of the world's geothermal features) creates a landscape laden with atmosphere, mystique and photographic inspiration and opportunity.

The greater Yellowstone ecosystem is also widely considered to be the finest wildlife habitat in the lower 48 States. In the grip of winter large numbers of bison can be seen around hot springs and in the sheltered valleys it is possible to encounter coyotes, red fox, elk, bighorn sheep and pronghorn antelope.

Bison gather around hot springs in the Firehole Valley

Bison gather around hot springs in the Firehole Valley

The Lamar Valley area, in the north east corner of the park, is one of the best places to see wolves. A number of packs that frequent the vicinity, although their movements vary considerably from year to year with changes in pack dynamics. Research teams are out daily to track wolf whereabouts and if good sightings are possible they are always happy to help. Along the Madison River valley bison and bald eagles are regularly encountered and bobcats are sometimes seen hunting waterfowl along the river margins.

This tour initially concentrates in the north western corner of Yellowstone, including Mammoth Hot Springs and the Lamar Valley, before moving to the spectacular Firehole River Valley, where there is the greatest concentration of geothermal features, and herds of frost-covered bison stand by steaming springs and numerous geysers, like 'Old Faithful', 'Castle Geyser' and 'Lone Star Geyser' erupt with predictable regularity.

A sun pillar appears over the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

A sun pillar appears over the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

A Red Fox 'snow dives' for rodents in the Hayden Valley

A Red Fox 'snow dives' for rodents in the Hayden Valley

Arguably the tour highlight is the final four days where we stay in the center of the park near the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, based at a Yurt Camp. This is the only permanent winter accommodation within the vicinity and allows us unprecedented and sole access to some of the most scenically spectacular and wildlife-rich areas in the park. Using over-snow vehicles we will visit the most dramatic locations like the Canyon itself, the Hayden Valley and Yellowstone Lake.

Along the Upper Yellowstone River, it is possible to see otters, beavers and several species of waterfowl, while the Hayden Valley is especially rewarding for bison, coyotes and red foxes hunting for rodents.

The cosy Yurt Camp provides a comfortable homely base and offers the opportunity to explore the areas close at hand, by snow-shoe and for those who wish on cross-country skis, including trails around the rim of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.

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INDIA: Jungle Book Journey: Central Indian Wildlife: March 2018
Tigress resting

A Tigress rests in a bamboo thicket

Dates: March 2018

Binocular IconPrice: £TBC (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Ground Only)


Maximum Group 10

Current Availability: spaces available

Register provisional interest

Read Tour Report 2014

Be it sights, sounds or smells, there's nowhere quite like India for assaulting the senses. There are few places more evocative or magical than one of its ancient forests: shrouded in early morning mists, shafts of light spear through the trees, there is a glorious palette of golds, ochres, oranges and greens and intense charged excitement when the alarm calls of monkeys and deer break the silence, triggering forest inhabitants into high alert as a tiger takes it first steps of the day.

Sloth Bear in Satpura

Sloth Bear in Satpura

While some of India's famous tiger reserves have become over-crowded and unrewarding in the wildlife experience they offer, lesser-known reserves still remain where tigers can be seen and the experiences are memorable for all the right reasons.

Tiger portrait

A male Tiger in Kanha

The epitome of this is Satpura, which offers arguably Central India's finest all-round wildlife experience. It is a magical place, separated from humanity by a large reservoir, with mixed deciduous forest covering hilly terrain. Through a combination of boat rides, walks and drives the park can be enjoyed at a sedate pace with plenty of time to take in its many treasures. Satpura can be particularly good for sloth bears and leopards as well as gaur, sambar and a broad diversity of bird life.

Male Gaur in a Kanha meadow

Male Gaur in a Kanha meadow

Better known are Pench and Kanha National Parks, which in recent years have enjoyed a reliable reputation for tiger viewing, as well as a broad diversity of other wildlife, including dhole (Indian wild dogs) and some of the highest densities of chital (spotted deer) and sambar. Their combined variety means spending time in all three is most certainly worthwhile.

It is all too easy to become preoccupied with one animal in India (tiger) and judge the success of a tour on seeing it, yet Indian forests also support a wealth of other charismatic species which are also exciting to see and photograph. This tour will concentrate on these three diverse reserves and offers the chance to experience India in a way that avoids the crowds as much as possible.

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BORNEO: Rainforests & Rivers: April 2018
Proboscis Monkey leaping

Proboscis Monkey leaping

Binocular IconDates: April - May 2018

Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group 10
Current Availability: spaces available

Register provisional interest

Few places conjure images of darkness and mystery like Borneo - the island has long nourished the imagination of naturalists and travellers alike. Charles Darwin once described it as "one great wild untidy luxuriant hothouse made by nature for herself", an incredibly apt description given the wealth and variety of fauna and flora on the island.

Morning mist hanging over Lowland Rainforest, Danum Valley

Morning mist hanging over Lowland Rainforest, Danum Valley

From the heights of Mount Kinabalu to pristine coral-fringed off-shore islands with great tracts of lush rainforest in between, the diversity of habitats supports a tremendous array of endearing and intriguing species - there are mammals, lizards, snakes and frogs that "fly", fish that "walk" on mud, monkeys that dive and swim, plants that eat insects and flowers the size of dustbin lids.

Most renowned are two extraordinary primates; the fabled orang-utan, literally "Man of the Forest", and the improbable proboscis monkey. Add to these, the spectacular rhinoceros hornbill, several species of pitta - exquisite jewel-like birds, a myriad of tree frogs and the giant Rafflesia, the world's largest flower and some of this natural wealth becomes apparent.

Focusing on the three most diverse locations, Mt Kinabalu, the Kinabatangan River and Danum Valley, we will explore a variety of evocative rainforests and have an excellent chance to see many of the island's iconic species.

Male Bornean Orang-Utan feeding

Male Bornean Orang-Utan feeding

Bloom of Rafflesia keithii

Bloom of Rafflesia keithii

There is also scope for numerous exciting night walks - Danum Valley is one of the best locations anywhere for these - where a completely different cast of characters become visible; there are numerous frogs, lizards and reptiles, bizarre invertebrates and if fortune favours endearing mammals like the western tarsier, slow loris and giant flying squirrel.

Juvenile Reticulated Python

Juvenile Reticulated Python

In combination the locations we visit offer a window in to the natural splendour of Borneo and provide a wide range of opportunities to experience and photograph the island's incomparable wildlife.

Rain forests in Borneo can be particularly warm and humid, so throughout this trip we have chosen lodges that best cater for comfort in our chosen locations. This does not automatically mean unnecessary levels of luxury: lodges in Borneo generally do not approach the standards that some in say Africa do.  It is all about striking an appropriate balance. On Mount Kinabalu, where higher elevations mean lower temperatures, the lodge is more 'rustic', where as our lodge in Danum Valley where it can be very humid is perhaps one of the finest in South East Asia.

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
PAPUA NEW GUINEA: Birds of Paradise & Tribal Culture: July 2018 (New Tour)

 

Male Raggiana Bird of Paradise

Male Raggiana Bird of Paradise

Binocular IconDates: July 2018

Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group 8
Current Availability: spaces available

Register provisional interest

New Guinea is unquestionably one of the world’s last great frontiers. It is the world’s second largest island, that is split into the nation of Papua New Guinea (PNG) and West Papua and Papua (together formerly Irian Jaya) that are part of Indonesia. Few destinations conjure visions that are more remote or evocative. Many areas are still largely untouched by time and Western influence. It is a place where pristine rainforests harbour an intriguing array of wildlife, and tribal peoples live in ways that have changed little in centuries.

Huli Wigmen. Haro Ngibe (foreground) and chief Timon Tumbu (behind)

Huli Wigmen. Haro Ngibe (foreground) and chief Timon Tumbu (behind)

The natural history is very special and very specialised, with influences that are sometimes south-east Asian, but primarily Australasian. The famed Birds of Paradise are certainly the islands’ show stoppers. These ‘living jewels’ are perhaps the most extreme expressions of the forces of sexual and natural selection and this stunning family of birds (that are most closely related to crows) have long been recognised and revered, thanks to their ornamental plumage, dazzling colours and extravagant courtship displays.

A huge Hercules Moth at Ambua

A huge Hercules Moth at Ambua

The Birds of Paradise, and the majority of the islands other species, including bowerbirds, parrots, hornbills and cassowaries, inhabit the various types of tropical rainforest, that still largely cloak the island. The forests are also home to many rare species of marsupial such as tree kangaroos and cuscus (although these are challenging to see) and flamboyant insects including the Queen Alexandra birdwing (the world’s largest butterfly) and Hercules moths.

Male Magnificent Bird of Paradise

Male Magnificent Bird of Paradise

This itinerary will combine the best elements of lowland and montane rainforests as well as coastal areas and enchanting cultural exchanges and festivals. There is little doubt that PNG is one of the world’s most exciting and challenging destinations and this tour is sure to provide an unforgettable experience.

BRAZIL: The Pantanal, North: August 2018
Southern Tamandua Collared Anteater Lesser Anteater Pantanal

Southern Tamandua

Dates: August 2018

Optional Extension:
Southern Pantanal
August 2018

Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group Size: 10

Register provisional interest

In the heart of South America, south of Amazonia and east of the Andes, lies an immense landlocked delta where seasonal floodwaters rise then recede providing an annual pulse of nutrients that results in one of the richest wildlife areas on earth - the Pantanal.

After rains in the surrounding uplands, more than 80% of the Pantanal becomes submerged (December-March) and wildlife is dispersed around the limited areas of dry land, but as these waters drain away and the land dries out, migratory birds return and other wildlife becomes more concentrated. These concentrations reach their peak in the dry season (July-October) when the remaining pools and flowing watercourses act like wildlife magnets.

Jaguar drinking, Pantanal

Male Jaguar drinking

The quantity of wildlife the area supports is breath taking, but it is more its accessibility that makes a trip to the Pantanal so memorable and rewarding photographically. Seeing iconic and rare animals frequently and closely is a very real possibility.

Yellow Anaconda, Paraguay River, Taiama Reserve,

Yellow Anaconda

Jaguars generally top everyone's wish list: there is no finer place in the world to capture images of  South America's apex predator and the chances of success are very realistic. This tour spends time in two river locations that are renowned: during morning and afternoon boat trips there is an excellent change of encountering jaguars, some times within pulse-racing close proximity.

Giant Anteater, Southern Pantanal

Giant Anteater, Southern Pantanal

Add to this, the likelihood of encounters with giant otters (the Pantanal is arguably now the best place in South America to see these magnificent creatures), Brazilian tapir, giant anteaters, hyacinth macaws, howler and capuchin monkeys, jabiru storks, toco toucans and countless capybara, yacare caiman and a wealth of colourful bird life it is easy to appreciate why the Pantanal is regarded as such a special place.

We combine two prime jaguar locations (8 nights), with a mixture of other locations away from major rivers where different habitats - a mosaic of grasslands, marshes, small rivers and still waters and forest patches - provide refuge for a tremendous diversity of species that are both relatively easy to see and approachable enough to offer great photo opportunities. Wildlife watching and photography on the rivers is by small boat, while at others locations there is a combination of guided walks, drives in safari trucks, night drives and horse riding.

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
CANADA: Great Bear Rainforest: Spirit Bear Quest: September 2018 (New Tour)

Binocular IconDates: 19th September - 3rd October 2018

Price: £8795 (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £7595 (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group Size: 12

Register provisional interest
Early morning mist hanging over coastal forest

Early morning mist hanging over coastal forest

Spirit Bear on Gribbel Island

Spirit Bear on Gribbel Island

Few places in the world are as evocative, ethereal and scenically spectacular as the central coast region of British Columbia. This mosaic of forests, islands, fjords and mountains is intricately entwined in the history and culture of the native First Nation peoples and its protection has led to the region becoming known as the ‘Great Bear Rainforest’.

The regions lush, temperate coastal forests are dominated by western hemlock, sitka spruce and red cedar, and these forests in turn support a wealth of wildlife. Renowned for its healthy populations of grizzly bears, black bears and locally endemic spirit bears, this area is also home to a diversity of other terrestrial and marine species – five types of salmon, wolves, mountain lions, numerous species of whales, sea lions, seals and various types of deer.

Orca leaping in Mathieson Channel

Orca leaping in Mathieson Channel

Being such a remote and rugged area, the logistics of travel in the Great Bear Rainforest can be involved and time-consuming. Hence, the most practical and enjoyable way to explore the region is from the comfort of a live-aboard boat.

Aboard our chartered motor yacht ‘Island Roamer’, we will be able to cruise the sheltered waterways accompanied by an expert local naturalist guide. This will give us maximum flexibility to investigate different locations and linger in those places that prove most productive.

Grizzly Bear with Pink Salmon

Grizzly Bear with Pink Salmon

As we journey between favoured spots, there will be ample opportunity to watch for wildlife, both in the sea and along the shorelines and estuaries. Daily shore excursions using inflatable zodiac’s, and shore and forest walks will allow us to fully experience the unrivalled richness of this part of Canada’s Pacific Coast.

In addition, to maximise bear photography opportunities, will spend time at a remote floating lodge at the southern edge of the Great Bear Rainforest, where a number of close and accessible sites that offer excellent grizzly and black bear viewing. A number of strategic hides provide excellent photographic opportunities at prime bear locations where a considerable intimacy and variety of shots is achievable.

Timber Wolves  resting on the shoreline

Timber Wolves resting on the shoreline

SOUTH ATLANTIC: South Georgia: October 2018 (New Tour)
King Penguin preening

King Penguin preening

Binocular IconDates: October 2018

Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group Size: 20

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Black-browed Albatross at sea

Black-browed Albatross at sea

In this day and age, superlatives tend to be rather overused. Where South Georgia is concerned, however, no amount of superlatives can do it justice. It has rightly been referred to a, ‘the most staggering wildlife show on earth’.

South Georgia may be only 170km long, have no trees and be half covered in permanent snow and ice but this rugged, austere wintery landscape contrasts markedly with the immense profusion of life that gathers around the coastal areas. The shores are smothered with hundreds of thousands of king penguins, cliff tops are encrusted with breeding albatross, petrels and other sea birds and the beaches are peppered with elephant seals. This is without question one of the wildlife wonders of the world and provides unprecedented photographic opportunities.

Wandering Albatross flying over the Bay of Isles

Wandering Albatross flying over the Bay of Isles

Most visits to South Georgia last three or four days as part of a longer itinerary also taking in the Falkland Islands and Antarctic Peninsula. The problem is that leaving South Georgia after such a short visit leaves you feeling unfulfilled and frustrated, especially as a photographer. Also most trips to the region take place later in the season (December to February), when the snow and ice has receded and the huge bull elephant seals have left the beaches.

Leopard Seal on ice flows

Leopard Seal on ice flows

This trip is different. We can now offer a tailored photographic voyage with ten full days of exploration around South Georgia at the beginning of the season, timed to coincide with the arrival of 
spring as the island emerges from
 winter.

Bull Southern Elephant Seal

Bull Southern Elephant Seal

Mid to late October is an exceptional time to visit as it marks the start of the wildlife migrations and beginning of the breeding cycle for many species. Scenes of male elephant seals (beach masters) battling for control of their beaches (and the female harems), the intimate and beautiful courtship rituals of albatross and antics of the penguin chicks, are a daily occurrence and will have you thinking you are immersed in your very own private wildlife documentary.

Our day-to-day itinerary will be influenced by the prevailing weather, but the intention will be to stop at all the major wildlife and historical sites on South Georgia. We begin along the southern coastline at King Haakon Bay, before sailing around to the more protected waters of the north east coast, where we can indulge in an in-depth exploration of the bays and harbours that run the entire length of the island, including iconic sites like The Bay of Isles and Salisbury Plain, Fortuna Bay, Stromness and Grytviken and St Andrews Bay and Gold Harbour.

King Penguins at Gold Harbour

King Penguins at Gold Harbour

The days spent at sea at the beginning and end of the trip are also very productive, with a constant stream of sea birds, including petrels, prions and albatross visiting the ship and various whale species seen at times.

There is little doubt any trip to South Georgia is an amazing experience that becomes indelibly branded into the memory. This extended photographic voyage is sure to provide an unsurpassed depth and variety of experience that will not only be unforgettable, but also provide a constant steam of peerless photographic opportunities.

Click: contact Nick to register for this tour
PATAGONIA, CHILE: Pumas, Penguins & Whales: November 2018
Female Puma prowls her territory

Female Puma prowls her territory

Binocular IconDates: November 2018

Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group 10
Current Availability: spaces available

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Patagonia, at the tip of South America is imposing, windswept and beautiful. Here, the southern portion of the Andes juxtaposes with wide-open grasslands to epitomise the very notion of wilderness.

Andean Condor over the Torres del Paine Massif

Andean Condor over the Torres del Paine Massif

Torres del Paine in southern Chile is a distinct rugged massif at the southern tip of the Andes and is often quoted as one of the most beautiful and majestic wild places on earth. Here breathtaking mountains meld with stark glaciers, blue melt-water lakes and free-flowing rivers.

This area is a refuge for a wealth of Andean wildlife and is a major stronghold for the region's top predator, the puma. The first half of this tour is focused in an area where seeing and photographing these beautiful cats is not only possible, but very likely. Certain areas of Torres del Paine support large populations of guanacos, the pumas main prey, and the cats are often encountered active and especially around dawn and dusk. 

The Torres del Paine Massif just after sunrise

The Torres del Paine Massif just after sunrise

We engage specialist local guides and puma trackers to maximise our chances of finding and photographing these sublime felines. Furthermore, the region also offers a chance of seeing and photographing other iconic species, like the Andean condor, together with other animals like inquisitive guanacos and grey foxes, that are surprisingly relaxed and approachable.

A Puma climbs among boulders at sunset

A Puma climbs among boulders at sunset

Lake Grey is another highlight within the park, where icebergs lie stranded on the southern shore after a slow drift from the Grey Glacier front. Despite its rather austere name, Grey Glacier is one of the most beautiful and colourful in Patagonia. The front is deeply crevassed and the solid glacial ice varies in colour from whitish to deep indigo. The glacier is flanked towards the east by impressive granite walls that are part of the Paine Massif, and towards the west by the eroded and low summits of the older Andes.

King Penguins displaying

King Penguins displaying

At the very southern tip of mainland South America the sub-polar influence on the wildlife becomes more apparent. At Useless Bay on Tierra de Fuego, there is a well-established colony of king penguins which offer straightforward access and good photography possibilities.

Humpback Whale waving its flukes

Humpback Whale waving its flukes

The Straits of Magellan separate mainland South America from Tierra del Fuego and are an important migratory route for many species. Carlos III Island within Francisco Coloane Marine Park lies towards the Pacific side of The Straits where deep water upwelling occurs close to sheltered waters creating rich feeding grounds for many marine species, particularly humpback whales. We will base ourselves on Carlos III island to take advantage of this and observe the feeding whales at close quarters, together with other marine mammals and a variety of sea birds, including different penguin species and black-browed albatross.

With out question Torres del Paine and the very southern tip of South America are Patagonia's premier wildlife destinations and in combination with unsurpassable scenery and comfortable and dramatically located accommodation this makes for a perfect photography tour destination.

 

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
ECUADOR: Hummingbirds & Amazonia: Future Dates: TBC

 

Blue Morpho Butterfly in Ecuadorian Amazon

Blue Morpho Butterfly in Ecuadorian Amazon

Dates: TBC

Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group 10

Ecuador is an amazingly rich, diverse and rewarding wildlife and photography destination. Lying on the equator, straddling both the east and west slopes of the Andes and encompassing the western extreme of the Amazon Basin, Ecuador supports 15% of the world's known bird species and in the Ecuadorian Amazon, live over 30% of all bird species in Amazonia.

But such staggering levels of diversity alone do not necessarily make for a prime photographic destination; the accessibility of the wildlife is also key. Here Ecuador also scores very highly. Locations chosen for this tour include some of the most astonishing hummingbird sites on earth, where literally dozens of species can be seen and photographed and two Amazonia locations that are each different in character, but in combination offer a range of excellent options and sites from quiet back waters, to parrot clay licks to rainforest canopy platforms.

Many-banded Aracari

Many-banded Aracari

Sword-billed Hummingbird feeding at a Devil's Trumpet Flower

Sword-billed Hummingbird feeding at a Devil's Trumpet Flower

Beginning in the cloud forests on the western slopes of the Andes we are based in a secluded valley, where bird diversity in general and hummingbird diversity in particular is astounding. Within the lodge grounds over 30 species of hummingbird have been seen and up to 20 of these visit the lodge feeders on a daily basis. Diversity on the eastern slopes of the Andes is equally impressive, but the species composition is different and therefore offers a wealth of new and enthralling photographic opportunities. Our lodge is a prime place to see the amazing sword-billed hummingbird, which in relation to body size, has the longest beak of any bird.

Wildlife watching from a canopy tower in the Ecuadorian Amazon

Wildlife watching from a canopy tower in the Ecuadorian Amazon

From the Andes, we travel into the Amazon Basin and divide our time between two locations that again offer different experiences and photographic opportunities. Both are located along the Napo River, but on opposite banks, where species likely to be seen and photographed will vary. One location may give us the chance to observe one of the regions top carnivores, the endearing Giant Otter and there will also be an opportunity to visit a renowned parrot-lick on at least one occasion.

The photographic opportunities on this tour will be broad. In all locations we will spend time looking for the more accessible wildlife like frogs, reptiles and insects which lend themselves to macro techniques. Bird and mammal photography will be more opportunistic, but is certainly rewarding, especially from canopy platforms. In the Andes there will also be time to get to grips with hummingbird photography, including various aspects of using flash.

 

ZAMBIA: South Luangwa & A Blizzard of Bats: Future Dates: TBC
Straw-coloured Fruit Bats at dawn

Straw-coloured Fruit Bats at dawn

Dates: TBC

Price: £TBC(Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group 10

Bring to mind the 'Great Migration' in Africa and thoughts inevitably turn to herds wandering across the Serengeti Plains. But Africa also hosts a migration on an even grander scale - the largest mammalian migration on Earth. From October to early December straw-coloured fruit bats from all over Africa converge on the Miombo woodland of Zambia to feed.

At it's peak some 10-12 million bats congregate and roost in a small patch of swamp forest in Kasanka National Park. Each day at dusk they fly out to feed and around dawn they return: a blizzard of bats in numbers that are hard to comprehend. Seeing it is to witness one of the world's greatest (and largely unsung) wildlife spectacles.

Straw-coloured Fruit Bats returning to roost

Straw-coloured Fruit Bats returning to roost

Bull Elephant feeding

Bull Elephant feeding

This tour combines time in Kasanka - which is also an excellent place to see sitatunga - with an extended stay in South Luangwa National Park, that is rightly regarded as the jewel of Zambia's extensive national parks network.

Leopard after dark with kill

Leopard after dark with kill

The Luangwa River forms the eastern boundary of this largely untouched wilderness and towards the end of the dry season and beginning of the 'green' season this regions offers an unrivalled safari experience.

The riverine areas attract large numbers of elephants, buffalo, giraffe (Thornicroft's), zebra (Crawshay's), puku and impala. There are also large numbers of attendant predators: the area is one of the best in all Africa for leopards, several prides of lions frequent the area and there is also good population of painted hunting dogs that are seen with reasonable regularity.

BOTSWANA: Giants & Predators of Mashatu: Future Dates: TBC

 

Mating leopards

Mating leopards

Dates: TBC

Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Ground Only)
Maximum Group 10

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African safaris offer some of the very best wildlife viewing and photography opportunities, but there is a danger they all become ‘variations on a theme’. As a photographer you are restricted to working from a vehicle and often have only a brief amount of time to react and hopefully get a good photo. How nice it would be to be able to ‘escape’ the vehicle and have the time to consider a situation in order to ‘nail’ the best possible picture.

Mashatu in Botswana offers just such opportunities. It is the epitome of all that defines wilderness areas in Africa. Visitors are charmed by the vast open spaces, the diversity of wildlife and the tranquility. In addition to ‘conventional’ game viewing and photography from open safari vehicles, Mashatu provides an alternative perspective with the use of purpose built photographic hides that offer many and varied photographic situations.

Elephants at a Mashatu waterhole

Elephants at a Mashatu waterhole

These hides have been positioned very carefully to provide interesting viewing angles with additional consideration to the direction of the sun, the background and the perspective the viewer occupies in relation to the subjects. These include two sunken hides that offer ground level viewing at waterholes, each giving a wonderful intimate perspective on the visiting wildlife.

The photo opportunities from a waterhole hide are spectacular

The photo opportunities from a waterhole hide are spectacular

A wide variety of species regularly visit the waterholes, from elephants to giraffe, eland and other antelope and predators including lions, leopards and hyenas. There are also numerous bird species that drink at the pools each day. The elephants at Mashatu are especially well-known and it is often the case that they occupy positions immediately by the hide when drinking and bathing – you might find yourself within touching distance of a forest of elephant legs and feet!

Watching a big male leopard at Mashatu

Watching a big male leopard at Mashatu

As a compliment this tour also visits Timbavati Private Nature Reserve in South Africa, which forms part of the Greater Kruger Park and ecosystem. Timbavati has been dedicated to conservation for over 50 years. More than 40 mammal species live in the reserve, including all the major predators like painted hunting dogs, lions and leopards, as well as healthy populations of elephants, white rhino, Cape buffalo, giraffe, eland, kudu and many other herbivores, as well as some 360 species of birds.

The area in which we stay forms part of a private concession and again offer tremendous photographic potential in complete seclusion. Game viewing and photography is from vehicles, where space is maintained for equipment. There is also the option to walk and enjoy the very different experience of the tracking wildlife in the African bush on foot.

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
ROMANIA: Danube Delta: Future Dates: TBC

RollerDates: TBC

Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Flights inclusive)
Price: £TBC (Twin-share: Ground Only)


Maximum Group 12

Current Availability:

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LEADERS: Nick Garbutt & Alex Hyde

The Danube is Europe’s second largest river delta and one of the continent’s great wetland wildernesses. In the spring and autumn it is a haven for migrating birds, as well a being the permanent home for a wealth of wildlife that includes not only resident birds, but mammals, reptiles, amphibians and an impressive diversity of insects.

DragonflyOur base for the trip is a superb new lodge on a private reserve in the heart of the Delta. It is remote and quiet (accessible only by boat) and within its 1000 hectares are an incredible variety of different habitats, that in turn support the impressive diversity of fauna and flora. An extensive network of trails allows access to all the prime areas and dotted around the complex are more than twenty photographic hides that have been set up to target key species.

Jackal_2In May the pups of the resident Golden Jackals are often visible and there is a hide dedicated to their den. At the time of our visit, more than 150 bird species are resident, with hides set up to target a number of these. Both European Rollers and Eurasian Hoopoes are very common and the various hides should provide amble opportunity to photograph many other species such as White-tailed Eagle, Western Marsh Harrier, Little Owl, Collared Pratincole, European Bee-Eater, Common Kingfisher and Black, Grey-headed and Lesser Spotted Woodpeckers. The varied wetlands provide a home for a fantastic array of dragonflies and damselflies, including species like, Broad Scarlets, Black Pennant and Lesser Emperors (all dragonflies) and Blue Feather-leg, Dark Spread-wing and Small Red-eye (all damselflies).

Boat_tripPurpose-built hide boats allow us to explore the intricate network of waterways and lakes in the vicinity, including the margins of the Black Sea. Here we hope to photograph flotillas of fishing White and Dalmatian Pelicans, Ferruginous Ducks and Red-necked and Black-necked Grebes. There are also rafts of water lilies where colonies of Black and Whiskered Terns congregate.

Sea-Eagle_2Of course with so many different options, the day-to-day schedule will be flexible and as much as possible we will target specific opportunities to coincide with the best time of day or light conditions. After dark there are also opportunities to see and photograph various nocturnal species. This is one of the best (and easiest) places in Europe to see Wild Cats. There are also several species of owl, most notably Long-eared Owl and Barn Owl and around the water margins European Tree Frogs and Eastern Spade-foot Toads.

The photographic opportunities at this location are many and varied and require a breadth of skills and techniques to take full advantage, ranging from using telephoto lenses in hides, to macro and the use of fill-in flash, to nocturnal photography using one or more flash units.

This trip will be co-led by Nick Garbutt and Alex Hyde, who between them have a wealth of experience and different photographic skills and this will allow maximum flexibility, with the potential for tailoring opportunities to individual clients’ requirements and as much small-group or one-to-one tuition time as possible.

Click: contact Wildlife Worldwide to book this tour
Dragonfly © Alex Hyde              All other images © Ultima Frontiera

Testimonials

We've been traveling with Nick for sixteen years, and have been lucky enough to have had some of the most wonderful animal encounters in awe inspiring locations, from Orang-utans and Proboscis Monkeys in Borneo, Jaguars in the Pantanal and the Wildebeest migration in Tanzania to the tiny things like pygmy chameleons and Giraffe-necked Weevils in Madagascar. No matter how big or small the subject, Nick will encourage and give advice on how to photograph it with unending patience and good humour.

Not a moment of any day is wasted often starting before dawn to perhaps admire the sunrise on Mount Kinabalu in Borneo and ending well after dusk maybe staking out an Aye-aye nest in Madagascar. And then there's the photo editing tuition if wanted in between. Every day is a new adventure and we can't wait for the next trip.

Jan and Nick, Madagascar 1998 & 2014, Tanzania 2000 & 2006, Borneo 2008, Pantanal 2011 etc.

We did want to sing Nick's praises in respect of our Serengeti trip. It is perfectly possible to go on a NG Wildlife Photography trip when you don't know anything at all about photography!! He is patience personified and he set about explaining what we needed to do to draw maximum benefit from the trip. I don't know whether or not it is his custom to organise tutorials during any free time, but this he offers very willingly and we simply could not have had a better teacher.

On the wildlife side of things, he is just awesome, so knowledgeable that you have faith in him right from the outset, and he never appears to tire of questions even after 14 days!

Our whole trip was also significantly complemented by Jombi and Faizal who could not have tried harder to present for us the best viewing spot, who were extremely knowledgeable in their own right and who were frankly an absolute joy to be with.

Jan and Paul, Tanzania 2014

A fantastic trip, and we would repeat it in a heartbeat if only we could! This was our first trip with Nick, but won't be the last. Nick is great trip leader, and a thoroughly nice person to boot. He works tirelessly to get the most out of the trip for everyone and, where possible, to tailor content to the wishes of individuals.

Early mornings and late nights are mainstays of this experience, but the great thing is you can do as much or as little as you choose - be warned though; the wildlife is compulsive! We'd hoped for wild orang-utan and tarsier; we were incredibly fortunate to see both. And what magical encounters too, so much more than just 'a tick'. Add in frequent night walks that reveal an entirely new perspective, and you've a top drawer trip. Nick knows the areas extremely well, and uses excellent local guides. Food and accommodation is fine throughout, culminating in the wonderful Borneo Rainforest Lodge in Danum Valley - a wildlife traveller's heaven!

Anne and Steve, Borneo 2014

"What a wonderful exciting and memorable trip to the Pantanal, with brilliant views of jaguars during the day and night, giant otters, caiman, capybara. birds & frogs - the list is endless !! Part of the trip included a visit to Iguassu Falls a definite must do.

Nick is an outstanding guide with incredible enthusiasm, patience and knowledge. He makes every effort to ensure that everyone has a close encounter of the wildlife kind which is unique and personal. Careful consideration is given to the welfare of the animals and minimising disturbance to the environment. Locations are carefully selected to give the best opportunities for intimate and rewarding wildlife experiences. The lodges were eco-friendly with lovely staff and enthusiastic guides. Photographic sessions were tailored to everyone's ability and were fun and informative.

A top quality trip!"

Barbara, Pantanal Tour 2012

This was not an easy trip, and the word 'holiday' may not apply - BUT the reward was fully worth the effort! On our adventure we stayed in all manner of accommodation, from western-style with modern comforts, to remote and basic bush camps in the forest. Food was mixed too, but included the best chocolate mousse ever.

But there is no such variation when it comes to the quality of wildlife viewing! We saw things, special things - and very special things. From the astonishing diversity of geckos and chameleons, through numerous kinds of lemurs, to the most remarkable aye-aye encounter, that will remain with us for life.

Nick is a brilliant trip leader, as is his local guide Hery - they are a winning combination. Expect long days, long drives and aching muscles, coupled with stunning scenery, exceptional encounters and magical memories. Be prepared for an assault on your senses. The culture and people add an extra dimension to this trip too, especially in the more remote areas visited. There are many reasons why Nick is a terrific leader - his expertise and patience (notably before and during the trip), his enthusiasm and tireless commitment, and his sense of humour. Not insignificant, either, is his taste in restaurants and patisseries!

Anne and Steve, Madagascar 2014

"Wonderful trip which lived up to expectations. Nick catered for our different photographic levels and interests and each of us came back having learnt new things an keen to learn more. The wildlife was abundant and there was a good variety of photographic opportunities. The guides Jombi and Faizal were terrific and their knowledge and enthusiasm really made the trip memorable. The combination of Nick and the guides and of course the wildlife made it a great trip"

Kathy & Brian, Serengeti Migration Tour 2014

As a professional wildlife biologist, a very novice photographer and someone with little experience of organised tours, I was somewhat apprehensive about joining Nick's trip to Madagascar. I certainly needn't have worried. Nick's comprehensive knowledge of the island, its wildlife and his local contacts meant we were often well off the main tourist routes and had wonderful opportunities to see some of the rarer lemur species.

Our small group size allowed us to have some very intimate wildlife encounters. Whilst always conscious of animal welfare, we never felt rushed and were able to observe fascinating natural behaviours. I'll never forget the aye-aye tapping a tree trunk to find food.

Nick went the extra mile getting us up and dawn and out again after dark to maximise chances of finding wildlife and optimise conditions for photography. He took time to ensure everyone had a chance to take photos and was always happy to help where necessary - which was often in my case.

I have some fabulous memories, pretty good photos and I'm already planning my next trip!

Jane, Madagascar, 2014

Our tour with Nick Garbutt was fantastic and we had so many incredible tiger sightings: even I got some great photos. Tigers, leopards, rhinos, wild dogs, bears, jackals and wild elephants are just a few of the animals we saw. We loved the whole trip.

Penny & Richard, India 2014

We had a very good Tanzania trip with Nick Garbutt who was an excellent group leader, very helpful for those needing photographic assistance - he was always patient, kind and prepared to go the extra mile for us. We also had two first class guides, Jombi and Faizal whose experience, driving skills and knowledge of the wildlife provided us with the best chances of good photographs. I will say that following my first Wildlife Worldwide holiday I will not hesitate to travel with the company again. Well done.

Gloria, Tanzania 2014

‘The whole trip was absolutely wonderful. The two Nicks (Mackman and Garbutt) were great, so patient and always there when we needed help. What an experience and a privilege to be supported by them, both at the top of their profession. I have not stopped talking about the trip since returning home.’
Louise

‘Thank you so much for the tour and all the photography and lightroom tips. You have a wonderful personality, enthusiasm and professionalism for leading the tours and obviously a lot of patience for all levels of experience’
Chris

‘You are an exceptional teacher. It was a joy listening to you.’
Jean

All Zambia Photo & Art Safari 2015

‘My trip was organised by Wildlife Worldwide, and led by the brilliant Nick Garbutt, whose knowledge of the natural history of Borneo is second to none, and whose wildlife and photography skills led to some great images (although don’t mention Atlas Moth!). All in all a brilliant trip, and I can’t wait to return!’

Adrian, Borneo 2015